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Doctoral Program in Interdisciplinary Research of Scientific Phenomena and Information

See Also→  School of Interdisciplinary Research of Scientific Phenomena and Information [Doctoral Course]

Introduction of School

This School undertakes education and research with an integrated approach based on mathematical and physics perspectives combined with an information science perspective that incorporates elements that have long been considered "integrated," in order to understand and develop upon various complex phenomena from a fundamental science approach. To accomplish this, the School of Interdisciplinary Research of Scientific Phenomena and Information is comprised of three Departments that enable collaborations in the fields of mathematics, physics, and information sciences: the Department of Mathematics and Physics of Fundamental Structures, the Department of Integrated Sciences of Physics and Mathematics, and the Department of Advanced Information and Computer Sciences.
Based on foundations in the natural sciences, this school undertakes research and education from an integrated perspective, using information-related and mathematical methods to examine natural phenomena and a wide range of phenomena related to humans, nature, and the environment. Specifically, the goal of this Department is to undertake fundamental and developmental research and education that will bring forth the seeds of new technological innovations. Examples of these themes are the discovery of laws and principles, the construction of creative theories, and the measurement of unknown phenomena, particularly regarding new types of phenomena that are deeply related to fundamental and applied scientific perspectives, as represented by phenomena in the context of "mesoscopic systems," which have joined the ranks of complex, micro, and macro systems. Through this research and education, we hope to foster individuals who can contribute to breakthroughs in fundamental sciences.

Educational Philosophy

Based on foundations in the natural sciences, the School of Interdisciplinary Research of Scientific Phenomena and Information conducts research and education from an integrated perspective, using information and scientific methods to examine a wide range of phenomena related to nature, humans, and society.
The School conducts complex and development education and research aimed at creating the "seeds" of new technological innovations targeting new types of phenomena deeply related to the perspectives of fundamental science and applied science; particularly those phenomena that occur in complex systems, and in mesoscopic systems, which exist between the micro and the macro world. These technological innovations might include, for example, those involved in the discovery of laws and principles, the construction of original theories, and the measurement of unknown phenomena.
In order for science and technology to develop so as to support the increasingly advanced information society of the 21st century, fundamental scientific breakthroughs will be essential. To promote these types of activities, education and research using a comprehensive approach and targeting the understanding and application of various phenomena is required, in addition to an information science approach that combines the perspectives of mathematics and physics with other composite elements.
This School offers three main courses as part of a system to enable collaboration among the three fields of mathematics, physics, and information sciences: Mathematics and Physics of Fundamental Structures, Integrated Sciences of Physics and Mathematics, and Advanced Information and Computer Sciences. Through these courses, instructors offer guidance based on cooperation that transcends conventional academic frameworks, thus enabling personalized one-to-one instruction that takes advantages of the small-classroom education characteristics of Nara Women's University's smaller scale.

Expectations of Students

The goal of the School of Interdisciplinary Research of Scientific Phenomena and Information is to foster individuals with a high level of knowledge regarding fundamental sciences, and the ability to conduct complex developmental research and education based on that knowledge. As such, the School welcomes the following types of students:

  • Students who want to seek out new problems on their own, and solve these problems from a fundamental scientific perspective
  • Students who want to conduct comprehensive, developmental examinations of new discoveries in the context of critical investigations
  • Students aiming to become educations who can foster an ability to think creatively and developmentally based on a knowledge of basic sciences such as mathematics, physics, and information sciences
  • Students aiming to become educational instructors in advanced complex sciences or core personnel with an ability to conduct educational research or R&D in the following research fields at universities, independent research institutes, and corporate laboratories:


Research related to IT and nanotechnology; high-tech fundamental technologies such as quantum effect devices and high-density storage technologies; information system technologies (encryption, security, etc.); and multimedia technologies (image processing, transmission technologies, etc.). Also, strategic planning for corporate planning and marketing divisions, and design of new commercial models at banks, insurance companies, and other financial institutions.


Department of Mathematics and Physics of Fundamental Structures

This department is at the vanguard of education and research in the study and clarification of universal laws and the theoretical structure hidden in various natural phenomena. Because many phenomena in the microscopic world are governed by strict mathematical structures, we link the physics of the microscopic world and mathematics together to achieve the aims of this course. This Department, with the mutual support of the Department of Integrated Sciences of Physics and Mathematics, offers the foundations of education and research in order to create basic scientific breakthroughs with an emphasis on providing the "seeds" of innovation in technology based on approaches that deepen awareness from a more universal point of view.

Tsuyoshi Kobayashi
Professor
Topology
Three-manifold topology; Geometry of knots and links
Junichi Matsuzawa
Professor
Algebraic Geometry
Representation theory
Minyo Katagiri
Associate Professor
Geometry
Geometric variational problems; Topological graph theory
Masato Shinoda
Professor
Probability
Probabilistic models of statistical mechanics
Shinya Moritoh
Professor
Analysis
Fourier analysis, wavelet analysis, and function spaces
Satoru Hirenzaki
Professor
Hadron-Nuclear Theory
Theoretical study of strongly interacting systems of hadrons and nuclei
Kenkichi Miyabayashi
Professor
High-Energy Physics
Accelerator-based Particle physics experiments, especially CP violation, heavy hadron spectroscopy, and Particle detector development
Hisaki Hayashii
Professor
High-Energy Physics
Experimental study of elementary Particles using high-energy collider
Yumiko Umegaki
Associate Professor
Number Theory
Analytic number theory
Tomohiko Takahashi
Associate Professor
String theory, string field theory, quantum field theory, unified theory
Theoretical Elementary Particle Physics
Hideo Nagahiro
Associate Professor
Hadron-Nuclear Theory


Department of Integrated Sciences of Physics and Mathematics

This Department conducts education and research based on a composite approach regarding the clarification of the structures of materials that demonstrate new types of phenomena closely related to fundamental science and applied science perspectives, or the theoretical mechanisms underlying these constructions. For example, based on connections mainly between the fields of mathematics and physics, the Department undertakes research and education related to new types of quantum conduction phenomena on a nano-scale (mesoscopic systems); characteristics of carbon nanotubes and other materials on a nano-scale; and special phase transitions and phenomena related to complex systems, including chaos and pattern formation. In complementary relationship to the research and education offered by the Department of Mathematics and Physics of Fundamental Structures, the Department of Mathematics and Physics of Fundamental Structures provides a foundation for education and research related to the creation of fundamental scientific breakthroughs related to the "seeds" of new technological innovations.

Tatsuya Uezu
Professor
Nonlinear Physics and Statistical Mechanics of Information Processing
Unification theory of phase transitions in phase oscillators and the classical XY model; Theoretical study of phase transitions in phase oscillators and the classical XY model with various interactions
Mikito Toda
Associate Professor
Nonequilibrium Dynamics
Theoretical study of nonequilibrium dynamics in quantum systems, biomolecules, chemical reactions, and social systems
Hideo Yoshioka
Professor
Theory of Condensed Matter
Theoretical study of highly correlated low-dimensional electron systems
Hidemi Ogawa
Professor
Radiation Physics
Experimental research on ion-atom and ion-solid collisions
Kazuki Yamamoto
Associate Professor
Metal Physics
Experimental study of crystal structures and physical properties of quasicrystals and intercalated, layered materials
Shuji Kiyokawa
Associate Professor
Nonlinear Physics and Statistical Mechanics of Information Processing
Opacity of hot dense plasmas based on time-dependent density functional theory; Atomic processes and electronic structures of ions in dense plasmas in external, strong magnetic fields
So Kitsunezaki
Associate Professor
Nonequilibrium Dynamics
Study of deformation and fracture of soft materials and pattern formation
Shuichiro Tsunoda
Professor
Algebra
Unified theory of algebra, geometry, and analysis
Taku Yanagisawa
Professor
Nonlinear Analysis
Nonlinear PDE and fluid mechanics
Shigeo Yamauchi
Professor
Astrophysics
Observational study of high-energy phenomena with X-ray satellites
Takeo Okazaki
Associate Professor
Algebra
Number theory and varieties
Kunizazu Ishii
Associate Professor
Radiation Physics
Naomi Ota
Associate Professor
Astrophysics


Department of Advanced Information and Computer Sciences

On the basis of the concept of "information," which is essentially interdisciplinary, the Department undertakes diverse and interdisciplinary research from computer sciences to fluctuations in the natural environment, and it undertakes education and research, including vanguard research on applying science on the basis of mathematical science. Education and research on information science, which involves IT and information processing, and those on boundary areas, such as fluctuations of the global natural environment and ecosystems, are undertaken with the complex views of information, mathematics, and physics. Also, we provide a foundation for research and education as an expanded receptacle for the "seeds," of new technological innovations brought in by the above two Departments.

Kazuki Joe
Professor
Intelligent Informatics
Fujio Kako
Professor
Computer Algebra
Algorithm for approximate algebraic computations
Yasushi Yamashita
Professor
Hyperbolic Geometry
Study on hyperbolic structures of low-dimensional manifolds
Satoshi Takahashi
Associate Professor
Fugo Takasu
Professor
Mathematical Biology
Mathematical and computational modeling of population, behavioral, and evolutionary biology
Sachiko Hayashida
Professor
Atmospheric Science and Remote Sensing
Analysis of atmospheric chemical and physical processes utilizing satellite measurements
Kanako Muramatsu
Associate Professor
Environmental Sciences and Remote sensing
Studies on environmental changes over land with analyses of satellite images
Naoyuki Nide
Associate Professor
Computer Science
Makoto KUJI
Associate Professor
Atmospheric Science and Remote Sensing
Studies on the atmospheric environment with analyses of meteorological data