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Environmental Sciences HP
Master's Program in Information and Computer Sciences, Chemistry and Biological Sciences at the Graduate School

Features of Education and Research Fields in the Environmental Sciences Course

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Environmental sciences course has been newly founded to respond to the requests from our society to find out solutions for various environmental problems such as global warming, pollutions brought by human activities, extinction of species and so on. Since many factors are contributing simultaneously to the environmental problems, our society desires the capable persons with flexible ideas and ability to find solutions over various fields of natural sciences. Therefore in this course, the students learn earth science, chemistry, biology, computer programming, modeling as well as related knowledge and skills from the faculty staffs. One of the most specific features is extensive use of computing techniques such as data analysis, simulation, and massive data handling. All these approaches are based on our academic achievements and we further attempt to extend high-level education and research in environmental sciences.


Features of the Curriculum in the Environmental Sciences Course

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Education in the Environmental Sciences Course is based on two pillars: 1) learning and understanding a wide range of phenomena in the global environment, life, and chemistry, and 2) acquiring the technology to analyze these phenomena, put them into models, and simulate them using computers.
Students can freely choose from a variety of subjects in the Department of Chemistry, Biology, and Environmental Sciences and take lessons depending on their interests, including experiments, practical learning, and on-site practical learning to experience the actual phenomena. Fourth-year students carry out cutting-edge research in a wide range of fields encompassing global environmental sciences, mathematics and life science systems, environmental chemistry, and biological environmental sciences, while receiving guidance from an individual teacher. From this wide range of fields, students can pursue the graduation and task-oriented research they are enthusiastic about.


Education and Research Fields

Introduction to the Environmental Sciences Course

Group of Global Environmental Sciences

Global environment observed from space

We research the properties of the earth's environment based on satellite observations in order to adequately comprehend current global environmental changes. Furthermore, we analyze the interrelationships between these properties to elucidate the processes causing the changes. The research covers broad fields, such as the development of remote sensing algorithms and simulation of global environmental changes.

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Group of Mathematical Biology

Mathematical and computational approaches to advance understanding of biological and environmental phenomena

We apply mathematical and computational techniques to explore a variety of biological phenomena and interactions with environments. Biological phenomena are intrinsically very complex. However, they can be abstracted as simple models described using mathematical expressions or algorithmic rules. By analyzing these models, we aim to better understand the processes underlying phenomena. This is a very interdisciplinary field of science in which the disciplines of applied mathematics, biology, and computational science are employed together.

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Group of Environmental Chemistry

Chemical approach to environmental science

In the Division of Environmental Chemistry, we aim to develop new analytical methods for archaeology and the preservation of cultural assets. We also adopt synthetic approaches to create new functional, environmentally friendly compounds for environmental analyses. In this research, we employ a variety of cutting-edge spectroscopic instruments: MALDI-, nanoLC-ESI, and GC-EI mass spectrometers, and an Ion Mobility Spectrometer. Equipped with these instruments, we analyze peptide and protein components of archaeological assets, develop new microbial identification software, "MVOC Finder", and characterize the newly created functional compounds that are under investigation. Furthermore, we investigate environmentally friendly molecular assemblies using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) at the world's largest synchrotron radiation facility "SPring-8".

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Group of Biological Environment Science

Biological approach to environmental science

Organisms affect their environments and vice versa at each level of the biological hierarchy from molecules to ecosystems. We study how organisms interact with their environments through interdisciplinary approaches involving molecular biology, genomics, physiology, and ecology, and apply the findings generated by such studies to our education programs. Our research and education can contribute to resolve environmental issues such as global warming, chemical pollution, and the conservation of biodiversity.

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Faculty and Research

Group of Global Environmental Sciences
Sachiko Hayashida
Professor
Atmospheric Science and Remote Sensing
Analysis of atmospheric chemical and physical processes utilizing satellite measurements
Kanako Muramatsu
Associate Professor
Environmental Sciences and Remote sensing
Studies on environmental changes over land with analyses of satellite images
Makoto KUJI
Associate Professor
Atmospheric Science
Studies on the atmospheric environment with analyses of meteorological data
Katsuyuki Noguchi
Assistant Professor
Earth and Planetary Atmospheric Science
Studuies on planetary atmospheres using observational data and numerical simulations
Group of Mathematical Biology
Fugo Takasu
Professor
Mathematical Biology
Mathematical and computational modeling of population, behavioral, and evolutionary biology
Satoshi Takahashi
Associate Professor
Laboratory
Mathematical Ecology
Modeling dynamics and evolution of lateral asymmetry in fish
Mayumi Seto
Assistant Professor
Theoretical Geochemistry, Geomicrobiology, and Ecology
Modeling of microbial and biogeochemical processes in soils, sediments, and aqueous systems
Group of Environmental Chemistry
Takashi Nakazawa
Professor
Proteomics
Establishment of protein archaeology based on the chemical and environmental characterization of proteins in cultural assets and archaeological specimens
Yuji Mikata
Professor
Environmental Analytical Chemistry
Development of compounds as tools for environmental analyses
Tomokazu Yoshimura
Professor
Environmental Colloid Chemistry
Development of environmentally friendly surfactants and study of removal of contaminated materials using colloid particles
Takae Takeuchi
Associate Professor
Environmental Mass Spectrometry
Study of microbial volatile organic compounds for the preservation of cultural properties using mass spectrometry
Biology-based Approaches to Environmental Problems
Kazuhiko Saeki
Professor
Laboratory
Microbial Genomics
Competition and evolution of soil bacteria
Atsushi Sakai
Professor
Laboratory
Environmental Biology
Ecophysiological and biochemical analyses of allelopathy (a chemical interaction among plants)
Satoshi Tamotsu
Professor
Laboratory
Photobiology
Physiological study of extraocular photoreceptors
Yoichi Yusa
Professor
Applied Ecology
Ecology, diversity, and control of marine and freshwater invertebrates
Takashi Ida
Associate Professor
Laboratory
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Ecology and evolution of plant reproductive strategies
Izumi Katano
Associate Professor
Laboratory
Freshwater Ecology and Conservation
Studies for biodiversity-environment interactions, community ecology, and ecosystem management in freshwater habitats
Kumi Sato-Nara
Associate Professor
Laboratory
Environmental Biology
Environmental regulation of plant growth
Hiroaki Sato
Associate Professor
Laboratory
Terrestrial Ecology
Ecological studies of interactions between animals and plants

Environmental Sciences HP
Master's Program in Information and Computer Sciences, Chemistry and Biological Sciences at the Graduate School