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Master's Program in Physics

See Also→  Department of Physics [Master's Course]

Physics involves research on almost every facet of nature, including micro-particles such as atoms and molecules from the microscopic world, consisting of matter such as subatomic particles and atomic nuclei, and matter in the world around us that consists of those particles as well as celestial objects and outer space. The Masterís Program in Physics arms students with the knowledge, thought processes, and methods to understand natural phenomena which occur at those levels. Students also research reciprocal actions and laws which work with the basic construction of matter at various levels, and aim to understand properties of various phenomena and matter in a diverse material world based on micro laws. This program consists of a course involving research on the basic structure of the natural world (Basic Physics Course) and a course which involves research on the properties of various forms of matter with a condensed multitude of atoms and molecules (Condensed Matter Course). Both courses partner each other regarding the theory and experimentation. In addition, the courses promote education and research in coordination, fostering unique and outstanding research, and aim to contribute to society through educating women for careers in advanced specialties.

Introduction of Department

The Department of Physics offers graduate students research activities in various fields of physics. The aim in this department is to study the fundamental structure and interaction for microscopic systems such as elementary particles, nuclei, atoms and molecules on one side, and to clarify the various phenomena and properties of condensed matter from the viewpoint of microscopic laws on the other side. The Department consists of two courses, the course of Fundamental Physics and the course of Physics of Condensed Matters. Close cooperation between the two courses as well as collaboration between experiment and theory is established in the Department, providing graduate students good environment for both research activities and education.

Educational Philosophy

This Department is comprised of two courses: the Fundamental Physics course, which examines the fundamental structures of physical matter in the natural world, and the Condensed Matter Physics course, which examines the various characteristics of condensed matter.
The goal of education and research in the Fundamental Physics course is to study the fundamental structure of matter, including elementary particles, nuclei, atoms, and molecules, by clarifying the mechanisms of interaction among these components, while the goal of the Condensed Matter Physics course is to study the various phenomena and properties of condensed matter in terms of mesoscopic and macroscopic scales.
Our aim is to promote education and research based on close cooperation between the two courses and between experimental and theoretical research fields, and to contribute to society by creating an outstanding, personalized research environment and fostering consummate professionals in terms of activities on both academic and societal levels.

Expectations of Students

All persons applying for entrance to this Department will be required to complete written entrance examinations related to basic courses (mechanics, electromagnetics, quantum physics, statistical mechanics, and English). There will also be a supplementary oral examination. Admission will be determined based on the results of both the written and oral examinations. The study of physics covers a wide range of topics, from outer space to the invisible world of the microscopic. We welcome students who have unique ideas, an insatiable curiosity with regard to the mysteries of nature, and a strong desire to solve these mysteries using both theoretical and experimental approaches, and who aspire to bring the specialized knowledge gained in undergraduate courses to an even higher level. 


Curriculum

Seminar in nonlinear and information statistical mechanics 1
Special Course in Plasma Physics
Seminar in nonlinear and information statistical mechanics 2
Special Course in nonlinear and information statistical mechanics
High Energy Physics 1
Seminar in High Energy Physics 1
High Energy Physics 2
Seminar in High Energy Physics 2
Special Course in High Energy Physics
Special Course in Nuclear Physics
Seminar in Nuclear Physics
Seminar in Nuclear Reaction Theory
Meson Physics
Quantum field theory 1
Quantum field theory 2
Seminar in Elementary Particle Physics
Special Course in Elementary Particle Physics 1
X-ray astronomy
Seminar in X-ray Astronomy
Special Course in Astrophysics
Astrophysics of Cluster of Galaxies
Seminar in Astrophysics of Cluster of Galaxies
Special Course in Nonlinear Dynamics 1
Seminar in Non-equilibrium Dynamics 1
Special Course in Basics Statistical Mechanics
Seminar in Non-equilibrium Dynamics 2
Seminar in Non-equilibrium Dynamics 3
Special Course in Non-equilibrium Dynamics 2
Introduction to Material Physics 1
Introduction to Material Physics 2
Theory of Quantum Transport in Ultrasmall Systems
Seminar in Physics of Mesoscopic Systems
Electrons in Metals
Seminar in Electron Theory
Magnitism Physics 1
Magnitism Physics 2
Ion Beam Materials Analysis
Seminar in Radiation Physics 1
Experimental Radiation Physics
Seminar in Radiation Physics 2
Special Seminar in Physics I
Special Seminar in Physics 2
Physics and Information Science
Review of Material Structures
Master Thesis Research in Physics 1
Master Thesis Research in Physics 2
Master Thesis Research in Physics 3
Master Thesis Research in Physics 4
Master Thesis Research in Physics 5
Master Thesis Research in Physics 6


The Course of Fundamental Physics

This course offers graduate students opportunities to study the elementary laws and basic structures relevant to some specific scales of nature. Both experimental and theoretical studies are available. The topics covered are physics of elementary particles and their interactions including string theory, high energy physics currently aiming to study the CP violation, theory of nuclear physics including exotic hadron structures, theory of atomic and molecular physics, theory of plasma physics, and cosmology. Furthermore, physics of complex systems such as chaos and pattern formation is also studied theoretically.


The Course of Physics of Condensed Matter

This course offers graduate students opportunities to study how the macroscopic properties of materials can be understood from the microscopic point of view. Both experimental and theoretical studies are available. The physics of condensed matters is essential not only for pure science but also for developing advanced techniques such as nanotechnology. The topics covered are radiation physics and its application to characterization of material properties, theory of condensed matters including low dimensional synthesized organic materials, Experimental studies of quasi-crystals and the martensite-type phase transition of metals. Furthermore, physics of mesoscopic systems are also studies theoretically.



Faculty and Research

Tomohiko Takahashi
Associate Professor
Theoretical Elementary Particle Physics
String theory, string field theory, quantum field theory, unified theory
Hiroshi Ohki
Assistant Professor
Theoretical Elementary Particle Physics
Particle phenomenology, lattice field theory, and non-perturbative gauge dynamics
Satoru Hirenzaki
Professor
Hadron-Nuclear Theory
Theoretical study of strongly interacting systems of hadrons and nuclei
Hideo Nagahiro
Associate Professor
Laboratory
Hadron-Nuclear Theory
Theoretical study of the structures and properties of hadrons
Shigeo Yamauchi
Professor
Astrophysics
Observational study of high-energy phenomena with X-ray satellites
Naomi Ota
Associate Professor
Astrophysics
Observational study of the structures and evolution of galaxy clusters; Development of high-resolution X-ray microcalorimeters
Hisaki Hayashii
Professor
Laboratory
High-Energy Physics
Experimental study of elementary Particles using a high-energy collider
Kenkichi Miyabayashi
Professor
High-Energy Physics
Accelerator-based Particle physics experiments, especially CP violation, heavy hadron spectroscopy, and Particle detector development
Maya Shimomura
Assistant Professor
High-Energy Physics
Tatsuya Uezu
Professor
Nonlinear Physics and Statistical Mechanics of Information Processing
Unification theory of phase transitions in phase oscillators and the classical XY model; Theoretical study of phase transitions in phase oscillators and the classical XY model with various interactions
Shuji Kiyokawa
Associate Professor
Laboratory
Nonlinear Physics and Statistical Mechanics of Information Processing
Opacity of hot dense plasmas based on time-dependent density functional theory; Atomic processes and electronic structures of ions in dense plasmas in external, strong magnetic fields
Mikito Toda
Associate Professor
Nonequilibrium Dynamics
Theoretical study of nonequilibrium dynamics in quantum systems, biomolecules, chemical reactions, and social systems
So Kitsunezaki
Associate Professor
Nonequilibrium Dynamics
Study of deformation and fracture of soft materials and pattern formation
Kazuki Yamamoto
Associate Professor
Laboratory
Metal Physics
Experimental study of crystal structures and physical properties of quasicrystals and intercalated, layered materials
Yuki Matsuoka
Associate Professor
Laboratory
Metal Physics
Experimental study of magnetism and martensitic transformation
Hidemi Ogawa
Professor
Radiation Physics
Experimental research on ion-atom and ion-solid collisions
Kunizazu Ishii
Associate Professor
Radiation Physics
Experimental study of atomic collisions of singly and multiply charged ions over wide energy ranges from eV to MeV
Hideo Yoshioka
Professor
Condensed-Matter Theory
Theoretical study of highly correlated low-dimensional electron systems
Masahisa Tsuchiizu
Associate Professor
Condensed-Matter Theory
Theoretical study of correlation effects in condensed-matter systems